Press

Reform's research and commentary is regularly featured in the media. You can find press coverage of Reform's work here.

We are always happy to comment on policy issues relevant to our work. If you would like a quote, an interview, or a background briefing, please email press@reform.uk.

 

Beyond gadgets report thumbnail

Report coverage: how EdTech can help close the opportunity gap

On 28 June 2018, Reform published a report on how EdTech can help close the opportunity gap. Media coverage included City AM, TES, FE News, EducateEducation for Everybody and Education Technology


Digital Healthcare Show

Digital Healthcare Show, 27 June 2018

The Digital Healthcare Show published a publication ahead of its conference. As one of the speakers at the conference, Eleonora Harwich was introduced in its pages and the conclusions of Reform‘s reportThinking on its own: AI in the NHS were also explored on page 3. See the full publication here.


Media coverage: David Lidington speech June 2018

On 25 June 2018, the Rt Hon David Lidington CBE MP, Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, gave a speech for Reform on public service delivery.

Media coverage included The GuardianPublic FinanceCivil Service WorldThird Sector and The Register .


Sunday Times

The Sunday Times, 24 June 2018

In an article in The Sunday Times on NHS spending, the author referenced Reform‘s report on devolved public-services commissioning.

“The think tank Reform argues for the Greater Manchester model of devolving NHS commissioning to local level to be adopted widely. It argues that 95% of NHS England’s budget could be devolved”

Read the full article here.


Love Sport Radio

Love Sport Radio, 22 June 2018

Tom Richmond, Senior Research Fellow at Reform, appeared on Love Sport Radio following the publication of Reform‘s latest report, A degree of uncertainty: an investigation into grade inflation in universities.

He argued that not only is grade inflation visible across most of Higher Education, the rate of grade inflation is accelerating. A large number of universities have at least doubled, if not tripled or quadrupled, their proportion of ‘Firsts’ in recent years, which shows that the current systems in place to protect quality and standards are not working well enough. A new approach is needed if the degree grades given to students at the end of their course are to remain meaningful to them and to employers.


BBC Three Counties Radio

BBC Three Counties Radio, 21 June 2018

Tom Richmond, Senior Research Fellow at Reform, appeared on BBC Three Counties Radio to discuss the findings of Reform‘s latest report, A degree of uncertainty: an investigation into grade inflation in universities.

He argued that rising grade inflation is a concern and is a pattern across the sector. The current landscape for universities is competitive, and lowering standards to get better degree grades may be a way to attract students to their institution. It’s important for universities to be independent from government but he argues that professional bodies should play a larger role in determining degree grades. 


Office for Students

Office for Students: response to Reform report

The Office for Students made an official response to Reform‘s latest report, A degree of uncertainty: an investigation into grade inflation in universities.

Nicola Dandridge, Chief Executive of the Office for Students, said:

‘It is important that degrees hold their value over time, and if there is artificial grade inflation this is not in the interests of students, employers or the higher education sector. The report by Reform is a useful contribution to the debate, and there is other work currently under way by the OfS and other partners to assess the complex issues involved, so that we can fully understand and tackle this in the right way.’ 

Find out more here.


Reform brochure Reimagining public services for citizens

Report coverage: report on grade inflation in universities

On 21 June 2018, Reform published a report on grade inflation in universities,  A degree of uncertainty: an investigation into grade inflation in universities. Media coverage included The IndependentThe TelegraphBBC NewsThe Times, a second longer op-ed in The TimesDaily MailTimes Higher EducationEducation InvestorForbes, Department for Education, The Scotsman, Spiked and an article on grade inflation and international examples in Times Higher Education.

Global coverage included news in ChinaEducation News and Study International. 


Talkradio logo

Talk Radio, 21 June 2018

Tom Richmond, Senior Research Fellow at Reform, appeared on Talk Radio to discuss the findings of Reform‘s latest report, A degree of uncertainty: an investigation into grade inflation in universities.

He argued that some employers are concerned about degree grades, some giving up on them as an indication of a student’s ability. The figures speak for itself: in the 1990s, 7 per cent of students were awarded a First; in 2017, the number has quadrupled to 26 per cent. There was a similar issue of grade inflation in schools which has now been squashed. This was due to the outside involvement of the then Secretary of State and Ofqual.


Today programme logo

Radio 4, 21 June 2018

Tom Richmond, Senior Research Fellow at Reform, appeared on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme to discuss the findings of Reform‘s latest report, A degree of uncertainty: an investigation into grade inflation in universities.

He argued that grade inflation has reached “extraordinary levels”. In the 1990s, the proportion of students receiving Firsts was 7 per cent. This has quadrupled to 26 per cent of students in 2017. It appears the reason for this is universities themselves with academics saying there is pressure to revise marks to a higher grade. Students will lose out most as employers are starting to give up on degree grades, finding them meaningless.

You can listen to the full episode here (Tom appears at 50.40).


FE Week

FE Week, 15 June 2018

In a recent article in FE Week, the Association of Employment and Learning Providers defend level 2 apprenticeships. Tom Richmond, Senior Research Fellow at Reform, responds to this in the article and is disappointed they aren’t acknowledging that many of these apprenticeships fall short of international standards.

“Reform strongly supports more apprenticeships in the service sector, but “too many level two programmes fall well short of international standards and simply would not be recognised as apprenticeships in other countries because they offer so little training”.”

Read the full article here.


All changes - where next for apprenticeships?

‘All change: where next for apprenticeships?’, 4 June 2018

Tom Richmond, Senior Research Fellow at Reform, wrote an essay in the Learning and Work Institute’s collection, ‘All work: Where next for apprenticeships reform?’. He wrote about the quality of apprenticeships in an essay titled ‘Quality first, access second?’.

You can find the collection of essays here.


ZD Net

ZD Net, 1 June 2018

In an article published by ZD Net on blockchain, Eleonora Harwich, Director of Research and Head of Digital and Tech Innovation, is cited and quoted.

“In its theoretical core, blockchain does have the intention to bring down power structures for sure. But I don’t think that’s the kind of applications we are talking about in the public sector,” says Harwich.

Read the full article here.


Public Technology

Public Technology, 30 May 2018

Rose Lakso-Skinner, Research Assistant at Reform, wrote an article in Public Technology. This op-ed argues that while GDPR is right to increase transparency and citizen control over data, we should not overlook the values and benefits of sharing data.

Read the full article (£) here.


Medium

Medium, 28 May 2018

Medium published an article about women in AI which focused on leading women in the space. Reform‘s Head of Digital and Technological Innovation, Eleonora Harwich, was mentioned in the article:

There are many, many more examples and Eleonora Harwich, Head of Digital and Technological Innovation, Reform, looks at examples of innovative use in the Public Sector such as predictive policing and the Serious Fraud Office use to detect large scale bribery in Rolls Royce.